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balance, interest rates were zero, the effect of the fiscal cliff is getting much worse than if the fed were not at zero. >> because they could do something. >> the only positive thing which dudley did not talk about but it is something that's on the radar is that, as the fiscal cliff fears rise, interest rates fall on the 10-year. so the effect the fed would have from easing is already in -- already happening as a market reaction. >> steve, thank you. >>> when jeff kilburg is not fired up about the irish he is fired up about what mr. dudley said today. why? >> absolutely. he came out with very dovish comments. he lass a permanent vote and he is quite the confidant of ben bernanke. so he flat-out gave a wink-wink, there's something big coming in less than two weeks. >> he's been a dove for a long time though. no change but just to hear it articulated gives you some sense of -- >> it does. this could be a one-two punch. if the fomc comes out with additional measures, subsequent week later, all of a sudden they have the fiscal cliff resolution, bam, we could see a test of the 1,460 of the
on capital, most regrettable. in a fiscal cliff free fall, tax rates on capital gains could rise to 24%. those dividends could increase to a whopping 44%. here now is former reagan economic adviser art laugher. how can you have capitalism without capital and why is there a war on capital, that includes cap gains, that includes dividends which will triple. it also includes the estate tax. why is there a war on capital? >> i have no idea, larry. i think it's just pure politics. but it's sort of lovely the words and looking them up. i understand that the french don't have a word for entrepreneur or laissez faire. [ laughter ] >> because they never use it. >> they never use it. economics is all about incentives. if you tax people who work, you pay people who don't work, don't be surprised if you find a lot of people not working. it's the rich issue here, which is just fascinating to me. if you tax rich people and give the money to poor people, you're going to get lots and lots of poor people and very few rich people. just look at what happened in britain two years ago when gordon brown rai
to avoid the fiscal cliff, which includes higher tax rates for the wealthy. house republicans are meeting with small business owners today as lawmakers are divided on how much they should compromise. we have the latest on the standoff in washington. >> good morning, guys. speaker of the house john boehner's new problem for the rest of this week is figuring out how to continue negotiations with the white house without losing his conservative base of support up on capitol hill. yesterday we saw senator jim demint go a little bit wobbly on the speaker of the house saying that the speaker had proposed an $800 billion tax increase that was going to damage the u.s. economy. now, interestingly enough, senator mitch mcconnell, the republican leader in the united states senate, said that he wasn't all that bothered by the republican house proposal. take a listen to what mcconnell said. >> i think it's important that the house republican leadership is trying to move the process forward. frankly, i had hoped we'd be accomplishing more in the real talks that are going on privately, but i can tell you
let our economy go over the fiscal cliff if a deal on higher tax rates for the wealthy is not reached? we're checking it out. back in a moment. [ male announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. it's easy to follow the progress you're making toward all your financial goals. a quick glance, and you can see if you're on track. when the conversation turns to knowing where you stand, turn to us. wells fargo advisors. >>> welcome back. this very public negotiation on the fiscal cliff still does not seem to be closing in on a deal. the white house out in campaign style events regularly, making multiple media appearances, kle including timothy geithner right here in 25 minutes. >> but would things be done faster if it was done privately? in his latest column, jeff goldfor a compares u.s. budget talks to merger proxy battles. jeff joins us to explain about that. plus, we have bob from jones day who
we could do is go over the fiscal cliff. we have the same tax rates that we have when bill clinton was president. significant cuts in defense and also significant human services can you tell us. >> katie, let me ask you, before you respond to what governor dean is saying. there is logic to what howard dean is saying. i don't happen to agree with it. but i know where he's coming from. katie, let me ask you this -- katie can't hear me. we'll wait for her to get back hooked in. howard, what about the notion that i'm posing tonight -- i've said this a few times -- republicans better be careful. they're not going down your road and the democrats aren't going down your road. you have middle class tax cuts for the democrats and it sometimes sounds to me as an old reagan conservative that the republicans better watch themselves because sometimes it sounds like they are kind of defending rich people. that's their whole mantra, just defending rich people. and i think that's not where they should be. >> i would agree. if i were politically advising the republicans, which i'm certainly not, i
over the fiscal cliff and also because the marginal tax rates are going to automatically increase, which means any lower tax rates president obama will ask for is tax cuts and not an argument you are raising taxes on someone. for all those reasons, the democrats have a lot of leverage in january but that does not mean the democrats should wait till january, what happens after december 31st is everybody can lose. the kind of pressure we have psychologically and politically right now to get a deal done before we hit 2013, that kind of pressure and deadline pressure and momentum you're not going to have after you're over the fiscal cliff. so every day that goes by after january 1st isn't going to look like that big of a deal and essentially, time will run out for both parties, you will have a lot of problems in 2013, they will take the lion's share away from fiscal dealmaking, senate confirmation, have the debt ceiling, the long-delayed nuclear negotiableses with iran, going to have posturing for the 2014 campaigns. all of those things are going to suck out the moment up that we have
parker, thank you. i want to talk to you some more. we'll go back to the fiscal cliff. if high end tax rates are successful entrepreneurs rocket higher, you can bet the number of millionaires in this country is going south. that's if high taxes go up. millionaires go down. that's no good. in our land of opportunity, i want more millionaires. and i think the better for them and the economy. robert frank will join us with some very arresting numbers. high tax, fewer millionaires. not good. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> 28 days until the country plummets off the tax and fiscal cliff. big tax hikes could be coming for everyone but we see also a drastic redu
the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect in an agreement that doesn't involve the rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest. all those americans get a tax cut under the framework under the first $250,000 of their income. in some sense, it's a tax cut for all americans. it's just for people who make more than that, we're going to ask them to pay a modestly amount more. >> that's hard to understand given how much going over the fiscal cliff would hurt the economy. why is going over the fiscal cliff worth it for just this one component? if you can get the other components, why wouldn't you take that? >> good question. thanks for asking. what we're trying to do is put in place a comprehensive balance set of fiscal reforms that put us back on the path to living within our means and create room for investing to make the economy stronger, make sure we're protecting medicare for future generations, and forcing the government to use the taxpayers' resources more wisely. in that context, you have to have a significant amount of revenues. we don't see a way of doing
tax attack. no matter what happens on the fiscal cliff. and is another bailout nation on the way? student loans up to $1 trillion, huge delinquency rates, default rates going sky high, no credit standards and sky high tuition. sound likes a real bad story to me. ceos have just wrapped up their meeting with president obama about the fiscal cliff and minutes ago john harwood landed a big fish. goldman sachs ceo lloyd blank finefein. >> the highlight of the meeting was the intensity from which the white house emphasized that marge al rates as a matter of math and politics have to go up somewhat, if not all the way to 31.6 had to go up and as p he said as a necessary ingredient of a deal, he would support such a rate. >> the president said we would pursue our own interests. i'm not -- i'm certainly not insisting, i don't even desire higher rates. i think there lab drag if revenue goes up and rates go up. but i think there will also be a drag on the american economy if our budget deficit widens out forever, if we're irresponsible and governor doesn't work. left with those four choices
. the reason? the fiscal cliff. if we go off the cliff, tax rates and dividends could more than triple or nearly triple from 15% to 43.4%. companies are racing to beat that tax hike by paying dividends before december 31st. arison is getting a potential tax savings up to $25 million. and larry ellison is getting savings of $56 million. tom frist will get more than $350 million from the company's dividend saving potential $100 million. and bain capital will get a piece of that and king of dividends is sheldon adelson. his tax savings on the dividend alone could be more than $340 million. all shareholders benefit from dividends and many of the ceos and owners recuse themselves from the dividend votes but these companies tend to have higher insider ownership. average inside ownership for dividend payers is around 27%. the average for the market as a whole around 7%. it all shows that if you can take next year's income today, you can also beat the tax man. simon? >> i mean, the question remains the degree to which you are harming the businesses by forcing cash out of them now. there are co
on what's happening with the fiscal cliff out of washington, the bank of england leaving its interest rate unchanged. at this point we're a few weeks away from the end of the year. money managers have an uncanny ability to drive stocks higher allowing them to claim quarterly performances that attract more money and higher fees. the practice is illegal but experts say that a sudden spike is a deliberate distortion of prices. as you'd expect window dressing is more common with thinly traded stocks and among the names of stocks appear to have been used as window companies, iridex, carver bancorps, altagen and legaga holdings. the next day the stock gives back some percentage of the gains, at least 3%. >>> the parade of companies announcing dividend changes continues because of all the uncertainty surrounding the fiscal cliff. cme group declared an annual variable dividend of $1.30 a share and accelerating the timing into the current quarter.'s sporting goods is announcing a cash dividend of $2 a share and says cfo tim coleman is retiring. >>> zynga -- i like to say that, zynga is filing prepa
over the fiscal cliff, what do you have to lose, the rates are going to go up. i don't think it makes any difference two tim geithner says. >> it is so widely held by so many who want to play the stock market, let's say, beyond just the capital gains, whether it's in taxable account organization not and it also has the psychological impact that this is the one that i'm going to get out of because i'm afraid of what's coming in general? >> this is the stock, yes, it's cheap, now once it goes down, we have a million reasons, well, it's a nokia phone, well, it's china. ipad miniis available. this is a stock that's so widely owned. it reminds me of sirius satellite. every doctor, every dentist owns apple. they don't know the price per share, they just know it is the proxy for the market. >> they just accelerated dividends. but i think we're talking now 150 companies in some fashion have accelerated or put forward a special dividend. you put forward a special market share, china is 76, with the market share at least. >> is it a disappointment that apple did not pay a special dividend? is t
year's fourth quarter. the reason? the fiscal cliff. if we go off the cliff tax rates on dividends could go from 15% to more than 43%. companies are racing to beat the tax hikes by paying dividends before december 31st and some of the biggest beneficiaries, both insiders and ceos. mickey arison is getting $89 million from carnival giving him a potential tax savings. and larry elison is getting savings around $56 million. thomas frist at hca is getting around $350 million, saving him $100 million. and kkr and bain capital will get a big piece of the dividends. the king of all dividends is sheldon adelson who gets $1.2 billion from sands corp dividend and his tax savings alone could be $340 million. all shareholders benefit from dividends and many of the owners and ceos have recused themselves from the dividend votes, but these companies tend to have higher insider ownership. the average insider ownership of these dividenders is around 27%. it all shows that just the threat of higher taxes is causing companies and people to take next year's income today when they can. >> yeah. it's i
's the catalyst? a lot of people are worried about fiscal cliff and sort of reluctant to put money to work. why are you so active? >> it's all about appropriate amounts of leverage. you can't borrow a lot, so you have to have the cash to be able to build. when you have a conservative capital structure and you're buying iconic assets in great cities, i think you'll do very well over time. traditionally, that's been proven in real estate. >> we all know it was a very hotly contested presidential election, and of course your dad, donald, has been on our program a lot. he was a big supporter of romney. there were stories going around that you said, dad, pull it back a bit. you don't have to be so negative on the president. is that what happened? >> it was fascinating because this was a widely circulated report that was without fact at all, and not one reporter actually called and asked the question you just did, which is, is that true? no, it wasn't. my father has been a very important part of the dialogue. he's been saying a lot of things that other people, you know, not wanting to be in a space w
dramatically higher interest rates because if they don't do a good deal for fiscal cliff and keep spending money, it's entirely possible this is going to be our come up -- >> the fed isn't big enough -- i thought i could count on rates below next year. >> i think demand is good. there will be a bit of inflation. people will be surprised. they ought to go get a mortgage now. they should be buying something now before that part of the economy heats up. housing stays strong. >> not europe. >> not europe. not asia. >> everyone is thinking about fiscal cliff. i have to go with i'm so worried about how many promises we've made in terms of $87 trillion of stuff we're not going to be able to afford and i am afraid we never, ever come to grips with it. >> that's why i think inflation is going to be an issue, joe, for exactly what you just said. kick the can does not last at 3% interest rates. it doesn't last. >> liesman is here. what's your -- he said if the jobless rate stays high is the biggest threat to 2013. why would the economy be bad? >> i'm worried about the long-term effect of joblessness
of the fiscal cliff. >> craig, you're the patient value investor. are you standing aside, waiting for this to resolve itself? >> you know, we use the volatility, the fiscal cliff to buy great businesses that are on sale. you know, the fact remains that the stocks are extremely underowned like i've never seen. i saw the other day, in 2006 pensions and endowments had about 60% of their enveinvestme in equities. that's down to under 35% in most cases. you also had four years of the much yul fund li mutual fund liquidations. i don't think the market is at great risk here. stay with domestic companies. stay with companies that have real high barriers of entry that are kpacheap. if you get caught up in the day to day news flow, you can get whipped in and out. the fiscal cliff will be resolved, whether it's two weeks or a month and a half. the market will move around, but long term it looks good. >> the question s how will it be resolved? jeff cox, already we are seeing a movement on the part of investors to say, if i'm sitting on a position where i've made money, i'm going to sell now g
investment bank should do is solve financial problems for people. with things like the fiscal cliff coming up and a radical change in tax rates and possible future growth rates, i just think there are going to be lots of decisions that need to be made. lots of interesting decisions that aren't just m&a. corporate boards need advice on that. i'm optimistic it will be a decent year. >> we hope to visit you during that year. thank you. >> back to you, melissa. >>> news for investors out there. let's send it to mary thompson for a market flash. >> cnbc obtaining a notice that the company is raising margin requirements for apple to 60% from 30% effective at midnight tonight. one thing we want to note is cnbc has spoken to other people on the equity desk. they say they are not planning to follow the raise of margin on requirements for apple. we want to note that core clearing will issue a statement on this later. back to you. >> all right. thank you very much, mary thompson. still ahead, live coverage of president obama's remarks on the fiscal cliff before the business roundtable. can the president
for an interview you'll only see on this network. see what he thinks about the fiscal cliff. >>> later on in the program, with the rush to sell high-end homes to take advantage of this year's lower tax rates, is it a good time now to snap them up? our wealth editor robert frank. plus, our real estate correspondent will tell you what you need to know back half of the show. don't miss it. >>> and here's a lye shot of the street outside the new york stock exchange. christmas tree is right behind the band there. they are ready for the tree lighting ceremony. expect it to take place about an hour from now. we'll take you there live. back in a moment. obligations. obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includ
put the chance of going over the fiscal cliff? >> i think the odds are somewhere in the neighborhood of about 15 ch about 15% to 20% that we go over. but my hope is that we don't. >> what happens to the market if we go over? >> i think we are going over, first of all. and i don't really think that we can get a good solution unless the markets force the issue. so one way or another, i think we have a near term correction. it either comes before the end of the year and forces the politicians to compromise now, or the beginning of next year and forces them after -- >> when does the bond market notice? i don't even care about the stock market. >> if you think you're going over the cliff, about the only hedge out there is like 30 year zeros. because think about what will happen. you'll slow the economy. they'll go to rates you couldn't believe if we really go over full bore. if we go right over with no solution at all -- >> what happens if we get a long term solution to all our problems? >> the thing you have to be scared of with rates is the thing you always have to be scared of, the eco
the fiscal cliff, which you just called serious business, or extending the lower tax rates and not the upper ones, which one would you choose? >> i'm going to do everything i can to avoid putting the american economy, the american people, through the fiasco of going over the fiscal cliff. >> which is worse, though, for the economy? >> what's that point of balance you just spoke about? could you put a debt limit increase in the overall package? >> as i told the president a couple weeks ago, there's a lot of things i've wanted in my life. but almost all of them had a price tag attached to them. and if we're going to talk about the debt limit in this, then we're probably -- there's going to be some price tag associated with it. >> last question. >> are you standing by your dollar for dollar -- >> i continue to believe that any increase in the debt limit has to be accompanied by spending reductions of that -- that meet or exceed it. >> thank you. >> with that, the happy talk azharry reid called it the other day is basically a thing of the past. speaker boehner saying he is disappointed in where
, maybe we'd be okay with the fiscal cliff. he says that is the best deal for everyone, the best deal for progressives, just to do it. to go back to the clinton era rates. you get rid of three quarters of the deficit just on tax increases at that point. >> and he says you get defense cuts. >> you can't get defense cuts any other way. and he's not the only one. there's a lot of people on the left and there's quite a few people on the right. i'm glad you're optimistic and a lot of ceos and guys in your position -- if you run a company, you don't need consumers petrified and business people petrified. this is the last thing we need if you run a company. i understand you have a horse in the game. >> but you also have the double trigger. if you go over the cliff, we've got the debt ceiling fight right afterwards. it's not like that's six months down the line. that's in if first month, six weeks of the new year. >> the other thing, depending on where you stand, the idea that we just get rid of congressional approval of the debt ceiling at all, which is that ludicrous proposal that was in th
this "fiscal cliff." this political theater, if you don't allow these tax cuts to expire on the rich, the 1%, it's .25% coming off of gdp. you are losing a quarter percentage point. granted gdp numbers were better than we thought they would be. you are still losing a quarter percent if you let these tax cuts expire. it's an odd thing when we're so fragile on growth. >> let me take you to the trading element. what's happening is you get continued announcement of special dividends. you have been buying stocks on that basis. talk me through where you are now on perhaps what people may buy moving forward. >> it's a process that you really want to take into effect. it's got to be a company that you think is going to have some growth going forward. i bought winn. based on the company's fundamentals and then also for the kicker, the special dividend. that's something that i played. i also bought costco because i like the company's underlying fundamentals and a kicker for the special dividend there. you must like the company. >> that's important. the stock as it goes ex-dividend as we saw with choi
on u.s. states. we have a look at which ones face the biggest threat from the fiscal cliff. >>> later, if you own a car but never drive it, you might be able to make some money off it. ashton kutcher and marissa mayer are backing the start up. the ceo of get-around is coming up. gecko (clearing throat) thank you, mr. speaker, uh, members of congress. in celebration of over 75 years of our government employees insurance company, or geico...as most of you know members it.congress. ...i propose savings for everyone! i'm talking hundreds here... and furthermore.. newscaster:breaking news. the gecko is demanding free pudding. and political parties that are actual parties!? with cake! and presents! ah, that was good. too bad nobody could hear me. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate comb
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23